Holes In The Veil By: Chris Brethwaite

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I am pleased to feature another guest post.  Chris Brethwaite’s beautiful story about a loved one’s communication from the other side of the veil is remarkable for several reasons.   Please enjoy!  I would love to hear your comments about after-death communications with loved ones.  

There is a flip side to NDEs, ADC – After Death Communication. Rather than a percipient visiting the other side, someone on the other side makes their presence known to the percipient. This can occur in a number of ways – lucid dreams, symbolically (e.g. a rainbow arching over the cemetery on the day of their funeral), synchronicity (e.g. a meaningful coincidence at a meaningful time), sensing the deceased person’s presence, smelling an associated fragrance like perfume or aftershave, hearing their voice, being touched or held by an unseen presence, or seeing them in either a ghostly or solid form.

My first ADC experience took place during my senior year in high school. I had come home late one night from my job at a local pizza parlor, and had gotten a bowl of cereal. After I finished eating, I just sat at the table, unwinding from a long day of school and work. When all of a sudden, I saw and heard the cereal bowl move about four or five inches across the table. I was stunned. I had never witnessed anything like that.

I knew the bowl hadn’t slid across the table on a layer of condensation. We lived in Phoenix, and there was no condensation because of our extremely low humidity. Additionally, the table had a crinkle-like finish, and I actually heard the bowl scrape across the table surface. Not knowing what to make of the experience, I simply went to bed.

Several days later, I mentioned it to my dad. He had something quite interesting to add. A friend of his had recently dropped dead at work from a massive heart attack. One night, and quite possibly the same night I saw the moving cereal bowl, my dad saw his friend’s apparition standing in his bedroom doorway. I remember my dad telling me that the hallway light had been on, and that there was no mistaking who it was. Consequently, I believe it was this man’s soul who moved my cereal bowl. He wanted to make his presence known to me, and chose a simple, non-threatening way to do so.

About three years later my dad passed away from diabetes. About a month after his passing, my sister Maryanne awoke one morning at her apartment to find him standing at the foot of her bed, looking at her. He was only there for a moment, but long enough for her to be freaked out by it. It unsettled her enough that she slept with the lights on for the next couple of nights.

Fast forward to the fall of 2006. I was now living in Kansas City, and working as a humor writer for Hallmark Cards. One night I got a call from my mom telling me that she had gone to Urgent Care, and that they had diagnosed her with some kind of respiratory infection. Unfortunately, after a week or so, she wasn’t any better. So I flew to Phoenix to check on her situation in person.

Two days after I got there, I accompanied her to the pulmonologist’s office. He put her x-rays on the lightbox, and I was shocked to see all these white masses scattered throughout her lungs. The doctor said they could be benign and didn’t seem overly concerned. Her next step was to get a needle biopsy done at a hospital.

I forget all the details, but it wound up being a huge hassle getting the hospital to release the results of her biopsy to me. In any event, I’ll never forget sitting in the hospital parking lot and reading the lab report saying she had stage 4 lung cancer. This seemed unbelievable to me because my mom never smoked a day in her life.

I drove home, walked in her room, and sat on her bed. I then held her hand, and broke the heartbreaking news to her. It was the hardest thing I ever had to do in my life.

About a week later, my sister-in-law, Rena, and I took her to see an oncologist. The three of us waited in an exam room for what seemed to be an eternity while he looked over her medical records. Finally, he came in the room. He said he was sorry, but that my mom’s cancer was too wide spread to be surgically removed or treated with radiation. He added that even the most aggressive chemo would only extend her life a couple months. He said if she chose to do nothing, she’d have about three weeks to live. Rena and I both comforted her. It was not the news we were expecting to hear.

My sister immediately took leave from her job in Denver and flew home. A couple days after she arrived, I flew back to KC to take care of some personal business. While I was home, I picked out a song to play at her funeral. It was “O-h-h Child” by the Five Stairsteps. It had been a Top Ten hit in the summer of 1970. I picked that song because the lyrics made me thinks of NDEs, particularly the line, “Some day, yeah, we’ll walk in the rays of a beautiful sun. Some day, yeah, the world will be brighter.”

We had some odd things happen in the final weeks of my mom’s life. One night I was sitting with her watching her sleep, when I heard her closet door shut. I looked over my shoulder, and saw that it was open. I got up and checked inside, but nothing seemed amiss. Another time, I had just laid down on my bed when I heard the brass bell my mom would ring when she needed something. I was in her room no more than three seconds later, only to find her on the opposite side of the bed from the nightstand where the bell sat. It was obvious she hadn’t rung it. I don’t even think she was awake.

One night my sister was in the living room watching TV when she saw a pen on the coffee table roll 360 degrees for no apparent reason. She hadn’t jarred the table or anything. We pretty much shrugged off these events because we were physically and emotionally drained.

When my mom needed more care than us kids could provide, we admitted her to a hospice. One morning, about two days before she passed, while I was sitting with her, she seemed to see something or someone to my immediate right. There was nothing there but a blank wall. I asked her what she was looking at, but she was no longer able to speak. She had a look on her face of shock and surprise, as though she couldn’t believe what she was seeing. My personal opinion is she had a death bed vision. I’m assuming she saw my dad, or her parents, or an angel standing next to me.  I was happy for her, and found the experience interesting, if not a little bit spooky.

My mom passed away at 1:47 a.m. on the morning of December 6, 2006. She was surrounded by those who loved her the most – me, my sister Maryanne, my brother Terry, and his wife Rena. After the nurse declared her officially deceased. We quietly gathered her possessions and left.

The next afternoon Maryanne and I had to go to the funeral home to finalize the arrangements, and to give them the CD of “O-h-h Child”. When I started the car, “O-h-h Child” was playing on the radio. My sister and I couldn’t believe it. I realize this could be nothing more than a coincidence. However, future events would cast serious doubt on that as an explanation.  In any event, what would come in the months ahead would defy all rationality.

My mom had been a devout Catholic, and if you asked us kids, a very loving and saintly person. She had spent her whole life sacrificing for others. In the months leading up to her death, she had struck up a special friendship with Father Ben, a priest from her parish whose job was to minister to the sick and dying. My mom would frequently tell me that if Father Ben stopped by and she was sleeping, to wake her up. I assured her that I would. When she passed, it was Father Ben who celebrated her funeral mass.

Probably my mom’s one and only hobby was collecting small clocks. They were displayed proudly on a decorative shelf in her living room. I had one clock at my house that was similar to the kind she collected. In fact, I’m reasonably certain she gave it to me. On the one month anniversary of her passing, I noticed that it had stopped working. I figured it just needed a new battery. A couple days later I got around to replacing it. When I went to set the correct time, I realized that it had stopped at the time of her death, 1:47.

For Easter of ’07, my sister and I sent Father Ben a check to help with his ministry to the terminally ill. We knew this was something our mom would have wanted. Shortly afterwards, I received a Thank You card from him. The next day I went out to my garage to put a new license plate frame on her car, which I had driven back from Phoenix.  The moment I set foot in the garage, I smelled votive candles, like you’d smell in a Catholic church. There was nothing in my garage that would smell even remotely close to candles.

Days later I was sitting on my couch reading a book about NDEs and ADC when I suddenly smelled votive candles again. I called my sister to tell her about the experience, and learned that she, too, had smelled votive candles. On the day I received the Thank You card from Father Ben, she had come home from a business trip to Houston, and had smelled them the moment she walked in the door. The smell was strong enough that she asked her then significant other if he had been burning candles for any reason, he said no.

Around the end of June, I experienced the votive candle smell again. I had a potential buyer coming over to look at her car and was busy straightening up the living room, when I suddenly walked into a “solid wall” of candle smell. It was overwhelming. I stopped dead in my tracks and stood there for a good thirty seconds inhaling the scent. Interestingly, this wall of smell was directly in front of my entertainment center, on which sits, the one cherished item I have from my mom – A Kachina doll in a glass case that she received when she retired as a nurse from St. Luke’s Hospital.

Things remained quiet until the morning of November 8th, when my sister called me at work. She told me that while she was getting ready for work, she had opened a compartment on her dresser to take out a piece of jewelry our mom had given her, and had suddenly smelled mom’s perfume. At that precise moment, the TV in her bedroom went gray. She knew she hadn’t lost cable reception because she could still hear the downstairs TV.

She went on to say she had nothing of mom’s that would smell of perfume, and added that it wasn’t even a recent scent, but rather, something our mom would have worn back in the ‘80s or ‘90s. Also, neither one of us could think of any significance to the date. Not that there necessarily had to be one.

That night I called my brother Terry in Phoenix and told him about Maryanne smelling mom’s perfume. I mentioned that we couldn’t think of any significance to the date. He quickly interjected, “I can.” He went on to tell me that he and Rena had gone to court that day to gain legal guardianship of our brother Mark who has severe Down syndrome, and that the guardianship was granted. It was the last piece of unfinished business from our mom’s passing.

This may or may not have a connection to my mom. Everyone can decide for themselves. About a year and a half before she became ill, I bought her a nearly new 2003 Oldsmobile Alero. She was so appreciative that she started crying on the showroom floor. I remember saying to her, “Mom, please don’t cry at the Pontiac dealership.” On a beautiful Saturday morning in November of ’08, I was sitting at my computer, and just for fun, was perusing the used cars on my Ford dealership’s web site. To my amazement, they had a nearly new Mustang for sale at 40% off the sticker price! I couldn’t believe it!  It had only been driven for six months and had 6500 miles on it.

It was a beautiful candy apple red, and everything about the car was as if I had ordered it from the factory myself. I couldn’t get down to the dealership fast enough. I drove it around the block and bought it on the spot. My salesman told me I got the deal of the day. They even had to call a guy in Dallas who was getting ready to fly up to look at it, and tell him it was sold. I couldn’t help but think that my mom just paid me back for getting her the Alero.

On December 6th of 2016, the tenth anniversary of her passing, I had to run some errands. Plugged into the stereo of my Ford Escape is an iPod loaded with 647 songs. The first song that played? You guessed it. “O-h-h Child”.

Chris and Mom in Sedona (1)

Author’s Bio: Chris Brethwaite is a cum laude graduate of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Arizona State University. Additionally, he holds a Master’s degree in liberal arts from Baker University in Baldwin City, Kansas. He is a long time IANDS volunteer, and former chapter head. He is currently working on a book titled, “A Paranormal Life”.  He can be reached at  ChrisBre@aol.com.

What I’ve Learned from One Year of Blogging

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If You are Prolific, Be Specific. 

After National Geographic interviewed me about my near-death experience, I started this blog. Seventy-nine posts and over 100,000 words later, I’ve learned a few things about blogging.

Being extremely intentional with your posts could help you create a novel.  The manuscript I’ve completed, Healed, sits at 96,000, though the revision process might bump the word count up or down.

If I would have realized I would write that much on my blog in a year, I might have been more focused.  I don’t regret the journey because learning is always exciting.  I’ve enjoyed writing book reviews as much as writing about after-death communications, writing about messages from my NDE as much as reflections about teaching.  This journey has taken me through a wild and beautiful landscape.

Consider Cultural Happenings and the News

Although we do not know which posts will get the most traffic, current events grab the attention of people, especially if you are writing about something that occurred in your area.  Also, being intentional about the world around you and anchoring love in the middle of chaos is a good practice.  The news can focus on the negative, but you can add your light, depth, and insights to certain situations.

Write Something Timely That Helps Others

One of my most popular posts is the post about completing the Medical Medium’s 28-day cleanse.  I wrote this because I hoped that my healing journey might encourage others with similar issues with chronic pain and autoimmune disorders to try the cleanse.  I was one of the first bloggers to document my experience with the 28-day cleanse, and I received a lot of support from Facebook communities devoted to the advice of The Medical Medium.  Facebook groups and Twitter groups can be a way to extend your blog’s reach.

Pay Attention to Those Who Reach Out to You and Pass on the Love

Shareen Mansfield who created OTV Magazine was one of the first bloggers to reach out to me.  I fell in love with many of her posts and the posts of those she publishes on OTV Magazine.  I even felt inspired to write an article for OTV.

Not only did I find supportive Facebook communities dedicated to topics of interest, but I found several wonderful writer’s blogs.  I witnessed several success stories and watched people like Raymond Baxtor take off with The Relationship Blogger this year.

Become a fan of blogs that move you.  Don’t just like posts, take the time to post thoughtful comments.  Create your own community and make it supportive and uplifting.  Consider showcasing the work of other bloggers and writers on your blog.

To My Friends!

Blogging, like social media, can lead to real connections and friendships.  This year, I’ve met angel communicators, NDErs, alien communicators, political activists, protesters, life coaches, health coaches, artists, poets, writers, ministers, college students, hospice workers, hospice volunteers, yoga teachers, meditation teachers, healers using a variety of modalities, mediums, naturopaths, shamans, and lots of people who read blogs.

Thank you readers, and thank you everyone for your emails.  I loved hearing from you whether you have shared your most profound loss, your greatest joy, deepest longing, or your earnest curiosity.  You are the you I was hoping to connect with in blogosphere.  I have a much larger tribe across the planet than I realized.

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What’s in a name?  Sometimes you are your own brand.  When you think Lorna Byrne http://lornabyrne.com/  you most likely think of her communication with angels.

When you think Gabby Bernstein, you most likely think turning fear into faith and living with divine guidance.  https://gabbybernstein.com/

When you think Tony Robbins, you think high intensity motivation.  https://www.tonyrobbins.com/

I simply guessed that after the National Geographic article, which featured a short blurb about my NDE, people would Google “Tricia Barker NDE” or “Tricia Barker Near-Death Experience.”   And they did.  To my surprise, tens of thousands of people used that specific search term.

In retrospect, this might not be the catchiest name for my blog, but it worked to a degree.  Will I change it in time?  Probably.

What should you name your blog?  Something you are happy with long-term.  Your name is not a bad idea if you are working to become a brand.

I hope that when my memoir, Healed, is published readers will think, “If Tricia can experience that kind of divine sense of purpose and healing, then I can certainly live a greater life of divine purpose.”

Be Careful with Your Tags in a Porn-Infested Internet Landscape

I wrote several posts about rape culture and my experience with rape in South Korea.  Unfortunately, some people search “Teacher Rape South Korea Porn” and are directed to my post about being an English teacher, living in South Korea, and experiencing rape.

Porn can be toxic to healthy relationships, and Dr. Robert Jensen spoke about pornography at one of the colleges where I taught English; his message transformed the lives of many young men and women.

The Relationship Blogger caught my attention with his post about porn.  Whatever your level of comfort is with writing about sex, trauma, pornography, or otherwise, realize that tags can filter the wrong crowd to your blog.

On the other hand, if you have a sense of humor, you might use lots of kinky tags for of non-related articles to boost your stats.  “Two Girls Making Out” might direct someone to “How to Complete Your Taxes in Under Two Hours.”  Together, we could start a blogging revolution.

Other Technical Stuff

I have a basic WordPress account, and largely the format has worked for me.  I like the set-up, and the layout.  It is easy to use, and graphics make the posts look nicer.  Would I like a snazzier looking blog?  Sure.  Do I have issues that I haven’t fixed?  Of course.  I don’t even know how to delete the extra category.  I have “book reviews” and “Book Reviews” as categories.  Lol.  Help me!  Somebody…help me.

Lordy, Lordy, Haters and Trolls

Haters and trolls are probably in deep pain and lost in drama.  Don’t be like them.  Don’t write about the confusing, dramatic parts of your life until much later when you have wisdom and serenity.  Write from places where you are solid and can give advice to help others, not when you are bleeding half-to-death because there isn’t much clarity in that state of mind.  Write about a well healed scar and show others how to get through painful situations.

Bless the crap out of people who hate you, and even if some people behave so badly that you think they should come back as a tarantula in their next life or believe they are currently living out a reality as a tarantula in a multi-universe and that is why they are having such a difficult time being human, bless them until they go away and have and awakening far, far away from you.

Remember you only see a small picture, and God sees the entire picture.  Learn to see a bigger picture, and write to win.  Write something so undeniably transcendent that even your haters will nod and turn in the other direction because they know you are helping others.

One of my surprisingly popular posts is one about narcissistic abuse.  I’m not a psychologist, but I’ve experienced enough narcissistic abuse in my life to see the last of my innocence float away and return with understanding and with healing.  If you write about pain, write in a way to bring clarity or healing to a subject.

And if those haters and trolls still come after you, remind them how years of Krav Maga and other techniques have made you not just a fireball, but an atomic force of nature.

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Who Loves You, Baby?

Nobody and I mean nobody will love your baby blog more than you do.  Your pretend soulmate, your wannabe soulmate, your twin flame for a day, the friends who are a godsend for correcting your typos and grammatical errors, your life-long best friend, your new best friend, your favorite ex, your least favorite ex, and even your real, true honest to God in the flesh stand by your side partner for life will get busy and forget to read your blog.  You and God know your blog better than anyone else, so write to delight yourself.  Write to inform or help others who take the time to read your posts. Write something you would be proud of one year or even ten years from now.

Consider Your Top Ten Posts

After you have blogged for a while, take stock of your half-year or year.

Why were some posts more popular than others?  Do you want to make more posts in a similar vein to your most popular posts?

What surprised you about the journey?  What didn’t surprise you?

Take a Break

Why?  Because you can.  Because you might work on something other than a blog for a time.  Because it excites you to take a break.

However, if it feels more exciting to keep blogging, then keep on truckin.

I guess they can’t revoke your soul for tryin.—Grateful Dead

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Top Ten Posts

  1. Excerpt About the Angels
  2. Excerpt After the Angels
  3. My Story as a Rape Victim and a Response to the Sentence for Brock Turner 
  4. Love Letter from God
  5. Messages from My NDE
  6. The Life and Eight Deaths of Ethan Michael Carter
  7. Lucky to Have Died, Lucky to Be Alive
  8. More About the Angels from My NDE
  9. Community College Instructor’s Response to Dallas Shooting

 

The Life and Eight Deaths of Ethan Michael Carter

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I’m excited to share a guest post today.  When I started blogging, I set an intention to find other NDErs who recently journeyed to the other side. My wish was granted when I connected with Ethan Michael Carter who told me about his eight recent deaths due to brain aneurysms.  I feel blessed to be one the first people to hear his story, and I’m pleased to share a few of his insights and afterlife experiences with you. 

I stood beside the brook and let my surroundings wrap themselves around me, warming me in a blanket of their calmness.  The water was a fragile hue of turquoises that fluctuated from deep to feint, much like the light sweep of a painter’s brush.

As it seeped and sneaked smoothly past all obstacles, the aqua even managed to hurdle the rivers boulders too. Twigs span freely as they moved along the liquid carpet, tracing a path from where they were now, right back to the mountain trees from which they originated. The brook flowed over the pebbled riverbed and sounded airy, loud and busy.

In the background, the mountains stood silently in the background, touching the sky with their high reaching majesty. And upon their lofty peaks lay peppered snow, delivered by nature to form elegant halos around the jagged heights.

From an expansive gash in a nearby rock face, a waterfall flowed without end. It looked like a continuous slide of silky-blue that decorated the mountain, highlighted only by the ice crystals that hemmed the water with silver. A distant and heavy sound emanated from the waterfall, sounding like the steady and continuous roll of a hundred drums. Glinting brightly with eye-squinting brightness, the slide of water generously fed the river.

To say I was in awe, would be an understatement.

Taking in a breath of perspective, I looked back at the swirling brook. The run off from the ice made it appear varnish clear and the surface glinted as if dream dust had been scattered over it, giving the water a glassy clarity.

My concentration flickered as some speckled trout drifted under the shady eaves of the bank, flicking their tails with elegant ease. Each time a fly happened to come to close, the trout would explode out of the water with dynamic efficiency. I could see them in almost slow motion, arcing in the air with their glistening bodies, performing their personal ballet in the river; all before landing back in the water with a plunking sound, and darting to the shadowy depths with their catch already stored safely within their bellies. The symphony and grace of the water seemed magical to me in that very brief, yet very meaningful moment.

It was a beautiful moment, but I had no idea where I was.

I did not know where I was, but I knew what I was, I was dead.

This beautiful place was what I call the Other Realm.

This was not my first time here. I had been to this realm many times. Back in Earth’s material world where I had come from, I had been suffering from brain aneurysms. I had had many episodes; some had been severe enough to cause brain bleeds and ruptures. These ruptures and bleeds on the brain had sometimes been so severe that they had caused my organs to shut down, and for me to die.

In total I had suffered 8 of these deaths so far.

Most of them would bring me to a huge house located by a hillside in what looked like Southern California, but was obviously not. I knew this as whenever I would leave that huge house, the inhabitants of the area were beings with faces made of light.

Light would emanate from every one of their orifices, and the light was as bright as car headlights, forcing me to avoid looking directly at them for too long.

On my first few visits, this would cause me great fear and discomfort. But by the fifth visit, I became accustomed to talking to these beings comfortably, if not casually, by addressing their chest regions as opposed to their faces.

The beings themselves looked like we did. Clothed, and with distinct personalities. I guess some people would call them “Spirits” or “Angels” but I prefer the term “Souls” or “Realmers.”

One of these Realmers was a man… being… called Caleb.

He stood tall at well over 6 feet tall, maybe even 7 feet. He wore a black T-shirt, unbuttoned black and white plaid half sleeve shirt, and blue jeans with black work boots. He was well muscled and his forearms revealed lean and sinewy muscle. Both forearms were decorated by a mix of scars and black tribal tattoos; tattoos that played off strikingly against the natural whiteness of his skin. His brown hair was of medium length, and his face — when I could bare to look at the light that he emanated long enough — revealed an unkempt stubble of browny grey. His voice was deep and raggedy, and he had an American accent. He had a very angry demeanor as his default setting, and a dark sense of humor.

I had met with Caleb twice. But it felt like I’d known him for a long time. You see, time means little between this world and the next. Our concept of time being linear is both laughable and simplistic when compared to the Universal understanding that Souls in the Other Realm have. In a lot of ways, our concepts feel like child’s play to them. Our greatest theories seem like the musings of children having tea parties with imaginary friends and just as imaginary food. But, just as we would humor a child, the Other Realmers view us with love and compassion; with an understanding of our misconceptions that is enlightening.

Each time I had died on Earth, my heart had stopped between 3 to 7 minutes (our time).  However, each of those minutes had felt like weeks to me, weeks spent in the other realm.

Caleb was a warrior Soul. And one that could appear to me in any way that he chose.  I had not known this on our first meeting and this fact was introduced to me in a very harsh and painful way.

Before meeting Caleb, I had encountered Realmers of peace and tranquility. Each previous death experience that had brought me to this realm had brought me warmth, compassion, fun and laughter.

But my first meeting with Caleb was very different. On my first meeting with him I was beaten so badly that I thought I may have found myself in “Hell.”

However, it turned out, or he told me after beating me, that his purpose was to address my fears and weaknesses — all with the aim of strengthening me. I also found that with Caleb, you must earn the right to enjoy your surroundings; something only earned by facing and conquering a fear.

Below I have listed some of the lessons that Caleb has taught me recently and my reflections on them.

Fear is restlessness, and restlessness is the enemy of peace.

Makes a lot of sense really. Fear is a trigger and takes you out of the moment.  It forces you to focus on your physical and emotional reaction to it.  You can’t expect to have peace within a moment if you are unable to observe a moment, especially if you’re too busy being a puppet to fear.

If you act with only the result in mind, you will fall and you will fail.

On the surface this may sound like nonsense because there are countless examples of where someone wanted something, endured obstacles, but their desire of the end result kept them motivated until they got what they wanted.

However, I feel this statement holds true because the expectations of an end result can often discourage and downplay the process in getting there.

For example:

Rather than setting an end result of say losing 15 to 20 pounds of weight in a month and then gauging our success on whether or not that was accomplished, wouldn’t it be easier to just choose to begin to take care of our bodies by working out? Therefore, adopting a healthy lifestyle and putting our focus on the journey and not the destination. This way we alleviate pressure and fear (see above) and create habits that will naturally lead to weight loss (or whatever you desire) in a more natural way.

Stale thinking, will hurt you.

Who told you that you’d fail in your own business? Who told you that you just couldn’t learn a language, or travel? Who told you that you can only jump at a certain height, or that you’re just not “lucky” or “talented” to do the things you want?

Whoever told you these things/ planted these ideas in your head; did they set them in stone within your heart and soul?

Too often we let past results dictate what our mind and bodies can achieve.

Understand that who you were, doesn’t have to be who you are. Our lives and our existences are all in constant motion, so make sure you are too.

You can and should be — evolving.

Rushing kills enjoyment

Having a rushed/ busy mentality prevents us from experiencing the moment.

We all lead busy lives. Lives that often result in us multi-tasking (eating on the go, talking while we work, etc.)

This lesson from Caleb enforced the importance to take time to fully experience one thing at a time. No matter how mundane or complicated the task we might just be surprised by how much it has to offer when we fully give ourselves to it.

Cowards fear defeat.

Don’t run away from defeat; in fact, stop evaluating everything as a win/ loss, or success/ failure.

In the human experience, we take something out of everything. It just seems to be a lot easier to value and enjoy what we take when it gets coupled with a favorable result. Imagine we didn’t evaluate all of our results and instead focused on what we took from the experience regardless. That would mean we would always be learning, and doing so without attachment to results.

Lead your thoughts.

Most people are led by their thoughts and therefore are actually a slave to them.

It is important to observe your thoughts, and be aware of them because thoughts are POWERFUL.

We are creative beings in this realm and in the Other Realm. The essence or building blocks of that creativity are found in our thoughts.

The thoughts we have become magnetized and will attract like thoughts, situations and experiences into our lives. So it is of vital importance to keep your mind aimed on only (ONLY) the things you desire, else you will attract that which you do not desire.

So, taking charge and leading your thoughts, is a very profound step.

Blindness to life

“There is never anything going on,” or “life is boring.” How many times have you thought and felt like this?

We’ve all experienced this at times to varying degrees, but the truth of the matter is that even in the most boring of moments there is plenty going on. Next time you find yourself “bored” take the time to truly observe your surroundings. Take the time to realize that your very existence alone, is a miracle in itself.

Thinking like this (leading your thoughts) will bring very interesting and exciting things into your life.

Everything has a purpose.

Even the most difficult, challenging or emotionally engaging experiences in life have a greater purpose and servitude to our existence. It’s our choice whether we want to look internally and find it, or continue to dwell on the outward experience it created.

It’s ok to die, as long as you lived.

Death does not equal sadness. Sadness equals the fact that some people never live.

A lot of people find a great deal of peace and strength in death.

For many people, death is a lot more of a profound experience than what many of us call daily life.

This is can be for two reasons:

  1. They realize that life is not limited to this current form and realm
  2. They just plain old have had enough of life

Unfortunately, many more people succumb to number 2, than they do to number 1.

You must live life and not let it slip by while you’re too busy existing.

Never give up what you love.

Don’t give up what you love, find love in what you do. The idea of giving up something that you love only stems from a disappointment in how it has worked out thus far. Rather than letting the past bury you, find the love in what you do and realize that no matter how it plays out, it is a part of you.

“What if I can’t?” is futile.

That’s the future, throw it out. All we have and can impact is this moment. Why would we let thoughts about a future moment hold us back from doing something that in this moment we would like to do.

Our “wants” are what hurt us.

Getting caught up in wants leads to nothing but suffering. When we don’t get what we want, we define this as “suffering.”

When we do get what we want, we quickly suffer because we can’t hold onto it as it either slips from our grasp or loses its previous value shortly after we attain it.

 

ETHAN

Ethan Michael Carter has worked as a professional ghost writer, author, fight choreographer, and stage actor.  Currently, he works as a screenwriter. Check out more of his fascinating biography here.  And if you would like to read more about his afterlife experiences, here is a recent post  on his blog https://livemorethanyouexist.com/

You can also follow him on Twitter

 

Photograph of stream by Alan and Marcia Socolik   http://alan-and-marciasocolik.pixels.com/

 

 

 

Recent Interview and A Few Thoughts about Prayer

I loved talking with Jannecke Øinæs in a recent interview, and she challenged me to think about concepts in new ways.  In other posts, I’ve briefly mentioned the prayers I felt during my near-death experience, but I wanted to write more about prayer.

Prayer:  One of the saddest questions I’ve been asked by a reader of my blog is from someone wondering why prayer does not work in some cases. Prayer isn’t a way to manipulate reality; instead, it is more like a gentle, healing wind.  When my spirit was out of form, I felt the prayers of people I knew, and the prayers that moved me the most were the ones that were full of love.

Maybe the best that we can do when we pray is to pray with deep, unconditional love and to pray for the highest good in any situation. Even if our vision of world peace and a deeper connection to nature is at odds with the world around us, even if we don’t have the power to immediately shift the world to a better place, we can embody the type of love we want to see and send this love to the world with our prayers.

This isn’t easy after tragedy, but the best stories are the ones that make us cry with a rare form of joy and awe.  We are amazed by people who overcome incredible odds.  We are amazed when love wins in the darkest of situations.  I was surprised recently to see Tony Robbins talking more openly about the abuse he survived growing up, and how this abuse motivated him later to help others.  In an article in Men’s Journal, he reveals,

“I really stopped feeling sorry for myself. I stopped blaming my mother for everything that was wrong in my life. She was addicted to alcohol and prescription drugs. She also was abusive and would smash my head into a wall or fill my mouth with liquid soap until I threw up because she thought I was acting out of line. I never talked about her while she was alive, and I still love her to this day. The fact is if my mother had been the mother I hoped for, I wouldn’t be the man I am proud to be today. All of this is inside me somewhere, driving me to visit 14 countries in a year and work 50 hours on a weekend. I suffered so much, I didn’t want anyone else to suffer and I was obsessed with finding answers. Now I am obsessed with having the answers and sharing those answers.”

Robbins also talks about the books that influenced his thinking, as well as his newest book.

How does prayer help others?  It can give a lonely wanderer strength to make it to an oasis.  Prayer can be the wind that carries the drunk safely home.  Prayer can be a message to someone departing the planet like a secret note.  It can be a nod of farewell or greeting, a bow of respect, or a heart shaped text from one mind to another.

I never liked listening to pompous, showy prayers spoken out loud in the churches I grew up attending. Even as a child, it was obvious to me that the majority of those prayers were about the ego of the one speaking.  The one praying wanted others to see how much of the Bible he knew by heart.  If the child wasn’t impressed, then there probably wasn’t much unconditional love attached to the prayer.

As a child and as an adult, I was moved not only by authentic prayers, but authentic deeds. I was always motivated and moved by those who transformed pain into a mission to help others.  Robbins is a good example of that kind of mission.

Can we pray for angels to assist in certain situations?  I know we can and should pray for their assistance.  At different times in my life, I’ve been gifted the sight to see how many angels are around us all, and there are so many of them.  To not call on angels is to miss out on a great resource.  My angels were assistants in my surgery, and angels are available to us in dramatic situations and ordinary situations where we sometimes struggle.  The medical medium suggests calling on specific angels for specific needs.

Why are some prayers answered and not others? Everyone struggles with this question, and the angels say to simply not struggle.  When you are in a state of love, you are doing great things for your own physiology and psychology.  The outcome is not as important as the act of being in a state of love and connection like a flower blooming.  Reach for the sun, reach for your own nourishment, and shine. Be aware of the process of life, and send great love into the world.

Certainly, studies have proven that meditation and prayer can reduce crime when enough people are consistently anchoring that kind of peace in the world.  You may not immediately see your prayer’s effects, but some tragedies might be avoided because of the authentic, loving prayers you pray.  Light may dawn in the lives of those who would not have otherwise awakened.

Two Corinthians Walk Into A Bar

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I’ve felt uninspired this week to create new content for my blog, mainly because I’ve felt more like reading.  There is a time to speak and a time to listen.

A few weeks ago, Marianne Williamson said, “If this is the religious right, we need a religious left” in response to the religious right’s lack of morality.  Growing up in the Bible belt, surrounded by the religious right, I’ve always thought that we need stronger voices from the left as spiritual teachers because a lot of compassion, tolerance, love, and beauty is missing from the political and religious right.

I admire spiritual teachers who come from a place of great love for all people, no matter their beliefs, and try to unite us all through love.  Love does awaken great compassion for all beings.

Though I aim for that ideal, I’m also an English professor who analyzes language, and I cannot find love in the rhetoric of the current administration or in the religious right for anyone except white males and fetuses.   

The God-consciousness I experienced during my near-death experience included everyone.  This God consciousness showed me a greater love, acceptance, and compassion than my human brain could comprehend.  I couldn’t bottle that astronomically powerful love force of God and take it back with me, but I remember what it was like to be in the presence of an all-knowing, all-loving God.

I can share what it is and what it isn’t.  God-consciousness was instantly enlightening, and it is my belief that the division between all people can be instantly dissolved in that light.

How do we get there though?  It is easy and instant on the other side.  It takes a lot more time here, and sometimes it isn’t achieved in one life-time.   Perhaps all we can do is work to enlighten the minds of those we encounter.

The God consciousness that awoke inside of me at a very young age taught me to care about the children in other countries, to care about the poor children in my own country, and to look deeply into the struggles of those who face racism, sexism, and homophobia and work to create a safer world for all people.

This work is hard.  This isn’t “snowflake” work because what a person does when he or she stands up to a bully or someone deeply established in patterns of hate and ridicule is the most difficult work on the planet.  To be a loving person capable of transforming the hate of the world makes you a superstar in the moments of your life when you succeed.  John Pavlovitz says this perfectly.

During my near-death experience, God didn’t say bulldoze sacred lands and pollute all water ways.  Instead, God said, “Go to nature for wisdom, for healing, for energy, and release of your worries.  Treat nature as sacred.”

During my near-death experience, God informed me that I needed to turn on the light of knowledge in others through education.  I’ve always believed that enough facts and logic can change the minds of people.  Logic is part of the light as much as love is part of the light.

It is logical to care about all people, and I am tired of defending “people.”  Love doesn’t need a defense.  Love simply is and accepts everyone where they are and tries to lift them up to a better place.  Through the eyes of love, we see that all human beings suffer, and we want to lighten that suffering for all beings. We shouldn’t have to first see their suffering to wish for their healing.  We shouldn’t have to first see their pain to wish for their joy.

In many ways, creating a more loving world is tough work, but love calls us to rise above our own wounds, educate others, and protect ourselves and others.   And through it all, we should love our own brave hearts more not less.  Whatever the life journey takes out of us, we love ourselves more when we choose to be on the side of love.

That said, shock value has its place.  It wakes us up from a sleepy day, energizes our system, and often makes us chuckle.

This is a time for belief systems to be shaken up, not stirred.

Two Corinthians walk into a bar and grab women in inappropriate, illegal ways. They get away with it because they are rich and powerful.  When told that they are wrong, they scream, “An Eye for an Eye.” (The Newly Revised Trump Standard Version of the Bible.) Later, they swear on a book they’ve never read and go out and destroy the earth for the almighty dollar.

Some spiritual teachers will disagree with me and not want to alienate anyone or make anyone wrong, but I am an educator first, and a woman with a spiritual message secondly.  The angels I encountered during my near-death experience were intelligent beings, and they did not traffic in lies and misinformation.  What they knew was clear, sound, healing, and solid.  It doesn’t take a master’s degree to intuit that our president does not speak based on solid, intelligent facts and traffics in hate.  I do not defend hate.  I shed light on it.

I said what I needed to say in an earlier post, and I have nothing more to say today.  I’ll let John Pavlovitz say it for me.

Sexism and the belief that women are inferior is fully exposed from the religious right’s point of view now.  Hopefully, the majority of Americans, no matter their vote, will not be silent in the face of hatred.

Fear is a lousy religion. 

I wish you were really pro-life.

We are not sore losers.

We have our reasons. 

This  is why we grieve.

And, most of all, when did compassion become partisan politics?

Finally, here are fifty more reasons to keep going, fighting, loving, and resisting.

And, if you like TED Talks, this one is interesting about how the political division is growing and how it could heal.

donjuanito

Happy Valentine’s Day 2017: Wanting For Nothing Else Other Than This Moment

heartlove

God’s Love:  Ask a near-death experiencer about love, and we are liable to talk about the best love of our lives which is God–the divine all-encompassing light, the filler of all empty spaces and sadness.  God is the true love who finally made me want for nothing else, the one who gave me undivided attention, care, concern, and compassion.

The presence of God during my near-death experience washed away all feelings of insecurity and of not being good enough.  There were no flaws or negative thoughts in the presence of God.  There was only I AM LIGHT & LOVE.

I was a part of God and God was a part of me.  God was also inside everyone else, so I felt a part of everyone too.  This divine intelligence was a love much better than the best romance.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy a good love story, especially ones like Wings of Desire, Bridges of Madison County, Before Sunrise, Amélie, The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Silver Linings Playbook, How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Annie Hall, and even The Notebook, but these stories always contain struggle and yearning.  In the presence of God, all yearning is filled with love.  There is no wish for anything because everything is complete and every desire sated.

Earthy Love:  Perhaps as spirits we choose form in order to celebrate the moment when our own spark of God is ignited again and we remember that connection.  Sometimes, we see a spark of God in another, but the real challenge might be to learn to see the spark of God in ourselves and in every moment of our lives.

Maybe we have to ask ourselves if we can we hang on to the beloved even when the spark isn’t visible and wait for it to ignite again?  Can we love someone through their own darkness until they find the light?  When do we need to love ourselves more than the desire for a relationship and separate from someone?  Abuse is a sure sign that a relationship is over.  Let that sink into everyone’s head and stay there permanently.

Chronic cheaters are also not a great gamble, but there are the random stories of reformed wild men and women.  And, oddly, some people I’ve met feel comfortable in open relationships; there are many ways to love and be with someone.  If abuse is not in the picture, consider what you both can do differently to have the love that you both desire.  Even small changes can make life more enjoyable.

If you have no pressing questions about your romantic life, don’t stress and enjoy the now. We are not promised forever.  Love your loved ones deeply.

Divine Purpose:  If you are at a true crossroads in a relationship, ask yourself what your divine purpose is.  Then ask yourself if the person in your life helps you fulfill your divine purpose.  Do they support your goals?  Do you learn how to love more because this person is in your life?  Do you learn how to communicate differently and understand how someone else thinks?  Do you give each other peace?  Are you becoming a better person because this person is in your life?

Most of all, no matter your romantic status,  love yourself immensely.  Imagine the love of God  is with you at all times because it is.  When you love yourself this way, space opens inside you to love others better and with a more open, joyous heart.

Occasionally, I get questions on my YouTube channel from people who feel despondent about the lack of love in their lives.  I don’t have many answers for these viewers, but I can say that the more peace and love I feel within myself, the better my relationships have become.  

As Langston Hughes said in the ending of the poem, “Life is Fine”, it is important to remember that life is indeed fine, grand, and wonderful in all of its seasons and expressions. Romantic love is only one part of the expression of love and definitely not something to make you want to die when you were so clearly born to live.

....I could’ve died for love—
But for livin’ I was born

Though you may hear me holler,
And you may see me cry—
I’ll be dogged, sweet baby,
If you gonna see me die.

     Life is fine!      Fine as wine!      Life is fine!

Your primary and most important relationship is with yourself.    Think kind thoughts about yourself and others, and love will be who you are not something you are searching for in another.   

What I think is the best part of being back in form is the attempt to love others in small and large ways as God loves us.  We fail, but when we try there is nothing better that we can do for this world.

morjanilove

Forgive Everything with Every Breath You Take

eternal-radiance_lg

For fans of healing geometry, here is a link to an artist, Ann DeRulle, who works in this medium. 

Forgiveness:  Many spiritual teachers talk about the necessity of forgiveness.  The sooner we can get through the stages of grief and get to forgiveness, the better of our inner worlds become.  I know we don’t take pain and trauma with us when we die.  I know it is washed away.  Bringing the light of the heavens, the love of the heavens into our own hearts to heal all that we have experienced is important.

In a sense, this kind of focus does bring more success into one’s life.  Although there is a basic truth to manifestation, the theory doesn’t explain everything about living in this complex, unpredictable world.  However, a positive focus, no matter one’s difficulties, makes for an easier journey.

The Now:  My near-death experience taught me to live in the moment and treasure each moment.  Forgiveness can be accessed quicker simply by switching one’s focus to all that is beautiful about the world whether this is a meal with friends or family or a walk in a beautiful park during your favorite season of the year.

To deeply access a place of forgiveness takes courage; forgiveness doesn’t mean that you continue to hang around people who harm you.  Forgiveness simply means you choose to love and appreciate yourself and your life, no matter what occurs before, behind, or beside you.  You are the embodiment of love.

Try to remember that when you are near death, you don’t want to yell at those who have hurt, shocked, abandoned, abused you, or otherwise wronged you.  Instead, you want to be surrounded by the people who love you.  You want to tell everyone you love how much you love them and how much you want only goodness and happiness for them.  And when you die, love is what you take with you.

The lesson you must learn during your earthly experience is to refuse to populate your mind with the people who have wronged you.  This kind of focus can rob of you of precious time and health.  Forgiveness of others grants you a wonderful, blissful life.

Your forgiveness lets others fly free, and most of all puts you in touch with the love of heavens.  Your hope that others might live better lives works to create a better world.

Our legacy eventually becomes how much we were able to love and forgive despite the conditions of this world.  So, forgive it all as if every breath might be the last one.

Death and Dying:  Even those who have the power to heal both themselves and others will eventually die.  We all die.  We don’t necessarily manifest death.  Death is just part of life.  Nature teaches us this.  You’re not losing the game by leaving the world early.  No one is losing by dying; it is just part of the life experience.

You are only losing out on the joy of life when you refuse to love deeply and forgive everything.  However, even if or when you are consumed by bitterness, try to remember that you are loved more than you can imagine. This might open your heart to forgive others.

A few years after my NDE, I remember meeting an older gentleman who had also recently experienced a NDE.  He decided to sell everything, retire, and live way out in the country in Montana.  His family freaked out and kept asking him what he would do if he had a heart attack out in the middle of nowhere.  He replied, “After making the 911 call, I would simply walk out into my gorgeous backyard, lie back on the ground, look up at the stars or the clouds, and send my love to this earth and everyone in it.  If I died there, I can’t think of a better way to go.”

I can’t think of a better way to go either.  Since you will probably send your love to everyone in the end, you might as well send your love to everyone in every moment of your life.

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This art piece by Ann DeRulle is called Ascended.

Comp Romp: Narrowing Down Comparable Titles/Inspirations For My Memoir:  NDErs (Brinkley, Alexander, Parti, & Moorjani) & Others (Winterson, Sebolt, McCourt, & Orloff)

healing-from-trauma

Comparable Titles:  Part of the publishing journey is figuring out where your book fits in amidst many published books.  Since this is my first manuscript, I want to share my writing and publishing journey with students and others.   I completed the first draft of my memoir Healed at the end of the summer, and I am working on my second, third, and fourth revisions.  Healed chronicles my journey from the moment of my accident and near-death experience through many years of teaching and other fortunate and unfortunate life events.  One of the main themes of the book is the power of the unconditional love of God to assist in our healing.

The Joy and the Agony of Writing:  I’ll be honest—writing a longer work like this can be fun, therapeutic, and exhilarating.  Revising and rewriting entire sections or scenes of a manuscript can be challenging, but even the challenges can be important lessons.  When writing a memoir, we learn how to tell the truth gracefully and what parts to emphasize or eliminate.  My editor reminds me that Jeanette Walls revised her lovely memoir The Glass Castle eight times, but that doesn’t make the process any easier.  I can only pray that my writing will occasionally be as lovely as Jeanette Wall’s prose.

Though I have more revisions to go, two small presses have contacted me after seeing my NDE video and reading this blog.  The interest in my story has given me incentive to keep working and look for an agent soon.  Some agents ask for a lot of information including a synopsis, detailed outline, cover letter, author bio, comparable titles (in some cases), and the first 50 pages.

Writing a manuscript is not a quick, easy task, especially when you work full-time; nonetheless, it is a labor of love and an obsession.  As Charles Bukowski says in the poem “So You Want to Be a Writer,” “unless it comes out of / your soul like a rocket, / unless being still would / drive you to madness or/ suicide or murder, / don’t do it. / unless the sun inside you is / burning your gut, / don’t do it.”

Despite warnings like these, many English majors and others continue to dream of writing a memoir, novel, or screenplay.  I hoped my first book might be a book of poetry or categorized as literary fiction.  However, when National Geographic interviewed me about my near-death experience, I realized that the brief blurb featured in their magazine did not capture the complexity of my journey, and I knew I had to write this memoir.  I’ve never tried to sell a manuscript before, and I hope my process might benefit students and others in their writing journey.

Themes: My memoir, Healed, echoes themes from many books besides books about near-death experiences, but the beginning and ending of my memoir centers around my near-death experience.  Some of the titles listed below are more inspirations than comparable titles, but when I explain my book these are the titles that come to mind.  Though my NDE was a life changing event, I wrote Healed mainly to help spread good energy into the world, and to help others heal from personal wounds which might be similar to mine.

Near-Death Experience Comparisons:

Saved by the Light by Dannion Brinkley:  This was the first book I read about a NDE after my own experience.  Like Brinkley, I was no longer the same person after my near-death experience, and I realized how kindness to others is one of the most important things we can practice.  The movie Saved by the Light came out a year after my accident, and I was happy to see a story about a near-death experience reach a wide audience.

Proof of Heaven by Dr. Eben Alexander:  I enjoyed the fact that Dr. Eben Alexander has a strong science background, argued that near-death experiences were impossible, and then had one and changed his mind.  I was agnostic before my near-death experience, but the minute my spirit left my form and I saw the operating room, my surgeons, and angels, I knew I had more than enough proof that the spirit does goes on.  I enjoyed many of Dr. Alexander’s beautiful descriptions of the afterlife.  The writing in his memoir is lovely, and the descriptions about the love of the divine reminded me of my experience with God.

Dying to Wake Up by Dr. Rajiv Parti:  Though I did not experience hell or past lives during my NDE, I identified with several themes in Dr. Parti’s book.  I grew up poor, and my focus after high school was getting into a good university and landing a high paying job.  Material success was a drive before my NDE, and when God told me to return to my life and work as a teacher I struggled with the idea.  However, I found that the divine light’s mission was exactly right for my life.  Teaching and serving others healed me and expanded my life in ways I never could have imagined.  In Dying to Wake Up, Dr. Parti also touches on his struggle with addiction, and this is a theme present in my memoir.

Dying to be Me by Anita Moorjani:  Anita Moorjani’s story is inspirational and exceptional.  Though I cannot claim to have experienced a healing as profound as hers, I saw angels sending healing light through my surgeons.  These beautiful light beings wanted me to know that they were their to assist and help.  They also wanted me to be aware that they could work through me in the future, and that they work through many others on the planet.  Moorjani’s message of self-love and listening to one’s intuition is one that I discuss at the end of my memoir.  Of all the near-death experiencers, her loving message is one that I resonate with the most.

Other Comparisons:

Why be Happy When You Could be Normal by Jeanette Winterson can be added to the list of inspirations mainly for her examination of dysfunctional parents and a difficult childhood.

Lucky by Alice Sebold:  Lucky is a searing memoir about a rape that occurred when Alice Sebold was a freshman in college.  The book examines how this moment in time affected her friendships, her relationships with her family, her identity, her attempts at romance, and her sense of safety in the world.  Rape is also a part of my story and occurred while I lived in a foreign country.   The aftereffects of rape extend for years.  PTSD and sexual trauma is profoundly painful and can even threaten to diminish the light of an experience as profoundly beautiful as a near-death experience.  As Sebold says, “You save yourself, or you remain unsaved.”

Teacher Man by Frank McCourt:  Frank McCourt became the hero of many English teachers and professors when his first book Angela’s Ashes came out.  Besides the near-death experience, my favorite sections to write were the sections in my book about my teaching experiences.  I went into the teaching field fully believing that God and the angels might work through me.  The love and hope that I had for my students transformed my life in ways I could never have imagined.  Their journeys taught me much about myself and helped me find the courage to heal my wounds.  Their success became my success.  I can tell that McCourt enjoyed writing about his moments in the classroom, so I include this book on my list of inspirations.

Second Sight by Dr. Judith Orloff:  I list this book because Dr. Judith Orloff felt more comfortable incorporating her intuitive gifts into her practice as a psychiatrist.  Directly after my NDE, I feared my intuitive gifts and didn’t want to be labeled a psychic, intuitive, or medium.  Using guidance in the classroom as a teacher felt perfectly natural, and I never labeled this type of guidance.  I simply helped the students I could help and opened myself up to assistance from the other side.

When I received a message from God that my contract as a teacher/professor was completed and that I could do “whatever I wanted to do” (even continue to teach if I wished), my mind raced in various directions.  I wondered if my contract was up because I might die soon.  This made me want to write my story in case I didn’t have much time on this earth; I wanted others to know the lessons from my near-death experience. Eventually, I realized I probably had more time on the earth, and if I applied the same principles I learned during my NDE to any work, all will be well.  In other words, work to inspire and help others grow.  In the process of helping others, we open ourselves to guidance and light from the other side, and that is a beautiful experience.

Comparable Titles:   Many unknown writers make the mistake of comparing their manuscripts to great books which have sold millions of copies and that is not my intent.  Of course, I’m tempted to compare my book to Wild by Sheryl Strayed , but I didn’t hike the PCT to overcome my personal struggles.  I know that nature has the power to heal us, and her story is a great testimony of this truth. My near-death experience was the awakening that I needed to find my way to greater healing, and my memoir is an attempt to bare my soul, as many other writers have done, in the hope that readers might relate, connect, deepen their own healing journey, and perhaps have the courage to tell their own stories.

 

 

Messages from My NDE

I hope these seven messages are inspirational.  It is important to focus on the good we can do in the world and work to create a world with more love and compassion for ourselves and others; most NDEs teach us this truth. This video discusses a few important messages from my NDE, but here is the abbreviated version.

Message #1: Be Open to Communication and Assistance From the Other Side

Our world does not celebrate the gifts of intuition and being right-brained as often as it celebrates the left-brain types of accomplishments.  However, the right brain is a lovely place to live.  Guided meditations might be one way to open more to imagination and connection.  Stilling the mind through mindfulness meditations might facilitate more receptivity.  The realm between sleep and waking can be a place to access messages as well.  However, these activities are not necessary for communicating with angels and guides.

These are simply possible ways to open your mind to divine communication.  Taking a walk might be a way to open to guidance.   Lorna Byrne says to simply ASK for communication from angels, and Ann Albers gives a beautiful overview of connecting with guides and angels in this article.

Message #2:  Be of Service to Others and Angels Might Work Through You

I wrote a post about how being of service is one way out of depression.  It is not the only way, but simply one part of shifting one’s focus off all that is wrong with one’s life to what can be done to help others. In serving others, our hearts open to the world.  During my NDE, I saw how powerful it was to help others and realized that the beauty we create in the lives of others is one of the main memories we take with us.

Message #3: Be Open to Others and Don’t Judge

During my NDE, I understood that many people were just like me.  They were doing their best, struggling to make sense of their lives, and trying to survive.  I saw that they needed as much grace and compassion as I was given in the afterlife.  Consider many different possibilities when interacting with others.  For example, those with poor social skills might have a disability or be suffering from an anxiety disorder.  Offer as much mercy and kindness to people as possible.

We are not that different; we are all more similar than we think.  During my NDE, I saw clearly how my judgments prevented me from knowing lovely, spiritual people in my vicinity.  Be open to kind people especially. However, personal boundaries and self-protection/love is a theme I come back to often. Abusers in spiritual communities and other areas of life can trespass on the boundaries of very loving, open people.  Love and openness given to others must be balanced with protection and love for the self.

Message #3:  Go to Nature

I made a recent post about this idea and believe that nature is healing, calming, and important for our mental health. Additionally, many people who experience an awakening have a greater awareness of the energy of certain foods and the importance of treating our bodies like temples.  I have found a lot of healing at different times in my life from a diet focusing largely on fresh, organic fruits and vegetables.

My grandmother, who lived in the country, picked fresh beans and vegetables from her garden and often said, “Food tastes best when the sunlight is still in it.” She had a good point!  Not many of us have access to food that fresh, but look for possibilities to eat the freshest possible foods.  Spend time enjoying the beauty of nature; it will reset your energy level and often erase your worries.

Message #4:  Be Like a Little Child

In Matthew 18:3 Jesus says, “Assuredly, I say to you, unless you change and become as little children, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven.”

It is easier to access the love of God with an open, trusting heart.  Children do this more effortlessly than adults.  Look for ways to be pure of heart and gleeful about your connection to the divine.  Greet your life with immense gratitude.  On a basic level, NDErs will always know the fragility of this life and how easily our lives can be ripped from our grasp.  We appreciate being alive, but you don’t have to have an NDE to be grateful, joyful, and peaceful.

Message #5: You Are Loved and You Are the Light

Before my NDE, I lived in an almost constant state of worry and fear.  I survived a lot, but this fear was not improving my life in any way; rather, it was destroying my well-being. The immediate knowledge of the immense love of God  during my NDE altered my perception of reality. It is important to know that fear can be dismantled and forgotten.  Remembering our connection to unconditional love can ease much of the strain of this life.

Message #6:  Be Good to Yourself and Others

This is a golden rule of most religions.  To me, goodness is more than simply doing no harm.  Goodness is making the world around you brighter, healthier, and a more positive experience for others.

Message #7:  Live a Purposeful Life

The last part of my NDE showed me that I needed to return to earth and teach.  You do not have to be a teacher to live a purposeful life. You do not have to have a NDE to know your life purpose.  You only need to infuse your actions with goodness and blessings for others with whatever it is you do in this world.

Years ago, I read The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren.   If there is a quote from that book that sums up my major life lessons, it must be this one: “Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you. Don’t waste your pain; use it to help others.” ― Rick Warren, The Purpose Driven Life: What on Earth Am I Here for

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Additional Lessons From My NDE:  Disconnection, Doing Your Best, and Adding Goodness to the World

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Free yourself from the psychological structure of society, which is to free yourself from the essence of conflict.  –Jiddu Krishnamurti

Disconnection: There’s no disconnection like real disconnection.  Leaving the body behind during my near-death experience gave me a perspective that I never imagined possible as an agnostic.  I carried none of my wounds to other side.  I was free as a bird, curious as a child, and smart as a dolphin outside of my body.

My consciousness survived, but I no longer had a deep, emotional, psychological connection to this human form.  That alone healed my wounds.  All the chattering of the mind, the repeating of offenses of others, and the storyline we all cling to evaporated instantly.

A Different Perspective:  I try to remember that perspective as I journey through life.  Whenever I am caught up in the drama of “she said this, he did this, and then they all did this,” I take a break and wonder what those situations will look like or if they will matter at all on my death bed.

I wonder if those situations will materialize during my life review.  If I was the one who was wronged, these situations probably won’t be in my life review.  The beauty and compassion of God is stunning and deeply loving.  God doesn’t replay the things that harmed us.  We do that to ourselves countless times while in form, but part of freedom is loving yourself enough to begin untangling and disconnecting from your wounds.

Goodness: I know that on the other side, I will look at my life to see if I eventually used the situations of my life to be better to others.  Did I continue to increase my ability to do good in this world no matter how people treated me?   Did I find more ways to be joyful, more ways to be whole, more ways to be lighthearted and uplift others? Did I make my interactions about healing and helping others?  Did I add goodness to the world?

Did I deeply enjoy my time on this earth?  Did I play like a child?  How often did I stand in wonder and awe at the beauty of nature?  Did I love as often as I could, even if that love was love for myself and a bird flying by me?  Did I use my intuition, my wisdom, my bravery, and my connection to the other side?  Did I love more than I thought I could when I first began this journey?

Did I retain some of my innocence?  Did I try to fashion myself as the hero of a situation with words, false and true, or did I simply do what is right and true?  Did I leave when I should leave?  Stay when I should stay? Did I climb to the top of a mountain, breathe deeply, and pull in a great stream of light from the heavens and send that light to every human being on the planet?

Did I do my best?  Did you do your best?

If you begin to understand what you are without trying to change it, then what you are undergoes a transformation. — Jiddu Krishnamurti

The moment you have in your heart this extraordinary thing called love and feel the depth, the delight, the ecstasy of it, you will discover that for you the world is transformed. Jiddu Krishnamurti

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